Latin IS English!

March 29, 2008

A Soirée with Fauré “Into Paradise” (In Paradisum)

soi·rée  Listen to the pronunciation of soirée \swä-ˈrā\
Function:  noun
Etymology:  French soirée = evening period, evening party; from Middle French soir = evening; from Latin sero = at a late hour; from serus = late; akin to Old Irish sír =long, lasting and perhaps to Old English sīth = late.  Date: 1802.
In paradisum deducant te angeli
Into paradise may the angels lead you.
in tuo adventu 
In your coming 
suscipiant te martyres,
may the martyrs receive you,  
et perducant te 
and may they guide you 
in civitatem sanctam Jerusalem. 
into the holy city, Jerusalem.
Chorus angelorum te suscipiat, 
May the chorus of angels receive you, 
et cum Lazaro quondam paupere 
and with Lazarus, once poor, 
aeternam habeas requiem.
may you have eternal rest. 
Rev. 21:1-4

Then I saw a new heaven and a new earth, for the first heaven and the first earth had passed away, and the sea was no more. And I saw the holy city, new Jerusalem, coming down out of heaven from God, prepared as a bride adorned for her husband.  And I heard a loud voice from the throne saying, “Behold, the dwelling place of God is with man. He will dwell with them, and they will be his people, and God himself will be with them as their God. He will wipe away every tear from their eyes, and death shall be no more, neither shall there be mourning, nor crying, nor pain anymore, for the former things have passed away.” 

  • For he (Abraham) was looking forward to the city that has foundations, whose designer and builder is God. (Heb. 11:10) 
  • Then the angel said to me, “Write:  ‘Blessed are those who are invited to the wedding supper of the Lamb!’ ”   (Rev. 19:9a)


Click here for a beautifully rendered “In Paradisum” full choir and orchestra video! 

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March 28, 2008

Vitae Lux (“Light of Life”)

 

 “VITAE LUX” — Sissel (music video in separate window) 

  • MELODY:  Frode Alnæs
  • LYRICS:   Ivar Dyrhau
  • ENGLISH TRANSLATION:  Robert Wermuth 
   

Vitae lux 
Light of life 
Vitae vis
Strength of life 
Unde spes vigens
From whom hope thrives 
Duc sub nocte per umbras
Lead during the shade of night 
Firmentur pedes
May (our) feet be strengthened.
 
Silentium
Silence  
Mox intrat
Soon enters 
Mortis vis valet
The power of death is strong 
Anget vitae semita
Life’s path will cause pain 
Ne nos occultet 
May He assuredly hide us.

 

March 25, 2008

A “Flood” of Words from Latin—Word of the Day: “antediluvian”

antediluvian.mp3

 

Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for March 22, 2008 is: antediluvian • \an-tih-dih-LOO-vee-un\  • adjective 1 : of or relating to the period before the flood described in the Bible 2 a : made, evolved, or developed a long time ago *b : extremely primitive or outmoded
 
Example sentence:  The researchers argued that the lab’s equipment was antediluvian and long overdue for replacement.
 
Did you know? Before there was “antediluvian,” there were the Latin words “ante” (meaning “before”) and “diluvium” (meaning “flood”). As long ago as 1646, English speakers were using “antediluvian” to describe conditions they believed existed before the great flood described in the biblical account of Noah and the ark. By the early 1700s, the word had come to be used as both an adjective and a noun referring to anything or anyone prodigiously old. Charles Darwin used it to characterize the mighty “antediluvian trees” some prehistoric mammals might have used as a food source, and in hisAmerican Notes, Charles Dickens described an elderly lady who informed him, “It is an extremely proud and pleasant thing . . . to be an antediluvian.

 

March 21, 2008

Latin “Ad Infinitum” . . . Even on Spring Break!

Filed under: Latin-English Resources — Robert Wermuth @ 1:57 pm
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It’s “Spring Break” from Latin (at least for many), yet it can still cross our paths unexpectedly.  For example, I just heard (on an older TV program re-run) that owning people money, who owe other people money, who owe other people money is similar to the following “proverb”—

 

“Big fleas have little fleas

Upon their backs to bite ’em.

And little fleas have smaller fleas,

And so . . . ad infinitum! 

March 11, 2008

“Go ahead and salivate!” — A Proven Method for Latin Vocabulary Study and Mastery

Here’s a proven method for vocabulary card creation, study and mastery. It’s based on the principle, familiar to some, called “conditioning” (“conditioned reflex”). In the 1890s Russian psychologist Ivan Pavlov demonstrated a repetitive occurrence in the behavior of dogs when presented with food accompanied by an additional stimulus (e.g., ringing a bell). Each time the dogs were presented with food, evoking salivation, a bell was rung simultaneously. After numerous trials of food presentation, accompanied by a ringing bell, with consistent occurrences of salivation by the dogs, the trials were run the ringing without food being presented—yet the dogs continued to salivate in successive trials. 

Similarly, this same “conditioning” principle is very effective in producing consistent memory results when studying Latin vocabulary. Since most pre-printed vocabulary cards only include the Latin word on the front of the card with the corresponding definition on the back, it’s important to create your own vocabulary cards with an important addition. Even if you use pre-printed cards, adding this additional information is critically important. “What is the additional information?” you may ask.  It is simply this:  Write the Latin vocabulary word not only on the front of the vocabulary card, but also on the back of the card—with the definition immediately under it. In this way, you are associating the original Latin word (i.e., the “bell”) with its definition (i.e., the “food”), so that, when you turn the card over to the front side, even though it’s not really there, after repetitive viewings you will actually “see” the definition under the Latin word on the front side of the card as well!  In a sense, you can “salivate” all the way through your study of frequently used Latin vocabulary words in gaining a mastery of those words. Try itit really does work!!

Latin Vocab Card FRONT FRONT of  Card (“mouse” over or click to enlarge)
Latin Vocab Card BACK BACK of Card (“mouse” over or click to enlarge)


Interested in taking a “live, interactive” online Latin class?  Take the POLL here!

A “Repertoire” of English Vocabulary Building Resources from Latin Root Words

“repertoire”  mp3

Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for March 11, 2008 is:

repertoire • \REP-er-twar\  • noun 1 : a list of plays, operas, pieces, or parts which a company or performer is prepared to present *2 : a supply of skills or devices possessed by a person 

Example sentence: “She is a pastry chef whose repertoire ranges from chocolate-filled croissants to old-fashioned scones and chocolate chip cookies.” (Linda Giuca, Hartford Courant [Connecticut], January 31, 2008)

 

Did you know? The Late Latin noun “repertorium,” meaning “list,” has given us two words that can be used to speak of the broad range of things that someone or something can do. One is “repertory,” perhaps most commonly known as a word for a company that presents several different plays, operas, or other works at one theater, or the theater where such works are performed. “Repertoire,” which comes from “repertorium” via French, once meant the same thing as “repertory” but later came to refer to the range of skills that a person has under his or her belt, such as the different pitches a baseball pitcher can throw or the particular dishes that are a chef’s specialty. 

*Indicates the sense illustrated in the example sentence.

 

March 4, 2008

Latin is a DEAD Language!!

“NOW IT’S KILLING ME” NO LONGER

Latin is a dead language,
As dead as dead can be. 
First it killed the Romans, 
And now it’s killing me!   

Many generations of Latin students have employed this little rhyme to voice their frustration over learning a language so very different from English. Granted, they might not get too much sympathy from those readers of this blog who have undertaken Greek, Hebrew, Aramaic, Syriac, and other Semitic languages, but for the average high school student, an inflected language like Latin can be bewildering.

Even for those who have learned Greek and Hebrew and other Semitic languages, there are times when you need to consult Latin texts such as the Vulgate, and if you don’t work with Latin every day, you may find the going a little rough.

Now there’s help for new students and rusty scholars alike. For some time now, we’ve been developing a grammatically-tagged and lemmatized version of the Latin Vulgate. The New Testament is now complete and was recently released at the annual conferences of ETS and SBL. Users of the tagged Vulgate can now drag their cursor over Latin words to get the full parsing information, and can find all inflections of a given lexical form.

The new tagged Vulgate module can’t bring the Latin language back from the dead, but it can reduce its ability to “kill” the Latin student!

 

“I’m Confused” . . . OR . . . “‘Babbling’ Away in the 21st Century!”

Filed under: Latin-English Resources — Robert Wermuth @ 8:06 am
Tags: , , , , ,

 Genesis 11 (English Standard Version)

The Tower of Babel

 1Now the whole earth had one language and the same words. 2And as people migrated from the east, they found a plain in the land of Shinar and settled there. 3And they said to one another, “Come, let us make bricks, and burn them thoroughly.” And they had brick for stone, and bitumen for mortar. 4Then they said, “Come, let us build ourselves a city and a tower with its top in the heavens, and let us make a name for ourselves, lest we be dispersed over the face of the whole earth.” 5And the LORD came down to see the city and the tower, which the children of man had built. 6And the LORD said, “Behold, they are one people, and they have all one language, and this is only the beginning of what they will do. And nothing that they propose to do will now be impossible for them. 7Come, let us go down and there confuse their language, so that they may not understand one another’s speech.” 8So the LORD dispersed them from there over the face of all the earth, and they left off building the city. 9Therefore its name was called Babel, because there the LORD confused the language of all the earth. And from there the LORD dispersed them over the face of all the earth.

 

March 1, 2008

And then . . . there’s humor for “Lexophiles” (= lovers of words)

Filed under: English Vocabulary Resources — Robert Wermuth @ 3:36 pm
Tags: , ,

HUMOR FOR LEXOPHILES  

  • I wondered why the baseball was getting bigger. Then it hit me.
  • Police were called to a day care where a three-year-old was resisting arrest.
  • Did you hear about the guy whose whole left side was cut off? He’s all right now.
  • The roundest knight at King Arthur’s round table was Sir Cumference.
  • The butcher backed up into the meat grinder and got a little behind in his work.
  • To write with a broken pencil is pointless.
  • When fish are in schools they sometimes take debate.
  • The short fortune teller who escaped from prison was a small medium at large.
  • A thief who stole a calendar got twelve months.
  • A thief fell and broke his leg in wet cement. He became a hardened criminal. 
  • Thieves who steal corn from a garden could be charged with stalking.
  • We’ll never run out of math teachers because they always multiply.
  • When the smog lifts in Los Angeles, U.C.L.A .
  • The math professor went crazy with the blackboard. He did a number on it.
  • The professor discovered that her theory of earthquakes was on shaky ground.
  • The dead batteries were given out free of charge.
  • If you take a laptop computer for a run you could jog your memory.
  • A dentist and a manicurist fought tooth and nail.
  • A bicycle can’t stand alone; it is two tired.
  • A will is a dead giveaway.
  • Time flies like an arrow; fruit flies like a banana.
  • A backward poet writes inverse.
  • In a democracy it’s your vote that counts; in feudalism, it’s your Count that votes.
  • A chicken crossing the road: poultry in motion.
  • If you don’t pay your exorcist you can get repossessed.
  • With her marriage she got a new name and a dress.
  • Show me a piano falling down a mine shaft and I’ll show you A-flatminer.
  • When a clock is hungry it goes back four seconds.
  • The guy who fell onto an upholstery machine was fully recovered.
  • A grenade fell onto a kitchen floor in France, resulting in Linoleum Blown apart.
  • You are stuck with your debt if you can’t budge it.
  • Local Area Network in Australia: The LAN down under.
  • He broke into song because he couldn’t find the key.
  • A lot of money is tainted: Taint yours, and ‘taint mine.
  • A boiled egg is hard to beat.
  • He had a photographic memory which was never developed.
  • A plateau is a high form of flattery.
  • Those who get too big for their britches will be exposed in the end.
  • When you’ve seen one shopping center you’ve seen a mall.
  • If you jump off a Paris bridge, you are in Seine.
  • When she saw her first strands of gray hair, she thought she’d dye.
  • Bakers trade bread recipes on a knead to know basis.
  • Santa’s helpers are subordinate clauses.
  • Acupuncture: a jab well done.

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